Gas forges

Gas forge family:

Like any good family, the Whisper family members each display their own individual personalities and strengths while also sharing many similarities. From small to large forges, shoeing, knife making, and art making forges, who would you hire to do the job?

Personality profiles:
Whisper Momma (mother)
Protective: Her solid insulated door keeps heat away from others.
Versatile: She offers many blacksmithing uses. Mothers need to be adaptable.
Warms quickly: Her heart warms quickly, reaching welding temperature in just 3 minutes.
Giving: She comes with a hose, gauge, and regulator. Thanks Mum!
A good listener: She has two open ears (end ports) to listen to your suggestions on how you would like to work your bar stock, whether from either end or 12” in the middle.

Whisper Momma gas forge
Whisper Daddy 3 burner (father)
Gets started easily: Enjoys pushing everyone’s push ignition buttons for a laugh, including his own. He thinks he’s hilarious.
Adaptable: This gas forge comes fitted for propane, but can be configured for natural gas.
Efficient: He has three high efficiency burners to ensure he gets the job done quickly and economically.
Creative: He has a large firebox which he finds great for making a wide range of art objects.

Whisper Daddy 4 burner (father-in-law)
Quick to heat: He has a fiery temper, quickly reaching 2350° F.
Large: The largest in the Whisper family, he weighs 83lbs with a firebox that measures 6″ x 12″ x 12″. But that’s not to say he can’t still get in and out of trucks and trailers easily. He’s not one to mess with, to be honest.
Quick recovery: Not only does he heat and reheat metal very quickly, he also always has a comeback that’s better than yours.

Whisper Baby
Small: The smallest in the family, he is the easiest to carry and transport.
Eats anything: His rear bar stock door allows him to be fed in one end and have it come straight back out the other.
Learns quickly: Despite having only one burner, he has already learnt how to heat quickly to 2350° F.

Whisper baby propane blacksmith forge

Whisper Benny (brother)
Gassy: He runs on gas. And it is his brotherly duty to use this to his advantage to embarrass his sister. (He learnt this skill from his father. The rest of the family are also gassy but they tend to keep it to themselves).
Techno-wiz: He fits machine made shoes, large or small.
Economical: His small exhaust lowers his fuel consumption, meaning he has more money to spend on the latest technology.

Delux (sister)
Adventurous: She enjoys being taken out places, and weighing just 50lbs she pretty much jumps in and out of your truck or trailer.
Sensitive: A typical teenager, a quick push of her button and she gets heated very quickly.
Withdrawn: Her stainless steel door keeps most of that heat bottled up inside.

Lowboy (uncle)
Open: With two open end ports, he is open to new ideas and experiences (like bar stock).
Grounded: With a low profile, he is stable and secure.
Sharp: A smart, talented gas forge with many hobbies, including damascus knife making.

Whisper low boy triple burner gas forge

They may all be a little different, but for the most part they all get on like a forge on fire.

All these forges are available within the US and worldwide from www.gasforges.com

Posted in Gas forges | Tagged , , ,

Pro Grip Studs

We recently launched our Pro Grip Studs website.

There are a number of studs, accessories and tools in the range.

The 3/8″ studs are premium quality and have a unique self clearing system to make it easier to fit.

We supply Pro Grip Studs worldwide and welcome dealer enquiries

Pro Grip Studs

 

Pro Grip Studs

Posted in Farrier tools and gear, Horse care, Horseshoes and hoof boots | Tagged , , ,

Brittania Leek and District Farrier Comp results

BRITANNIA, LEEK AND DISTRICT AGRICULTURAL SHOW SHOEMAKING COMPETITION SATURDAY 27th JULY 2013 RESULTS

There was a very good turnout of competitors, who came from across the country. A big well done to all of them for competing in such extreme heat. The shoemaking is a big attraction for the general public visiting Leek Show, who where also very keen to watch such talented men and women throughout the day. A big thank you to Mr Michael Handley and Mr Richard Slater for judging the competition. Trevor, Josh and Clare would also like to thank all the sponsors for sponsoring this years event.

It has already been confirmed that the 2014 shoemaking competition has been confirmed for the 26th July 2014. Rosettes, prize cards, trophies, fantastic prizes and prize money.

Results follow

CLASS 1 – 1ST YEAR APPRENTICE
1ST SAM JOHNSON
2ND ELLA OATLEY
3RD ANDREW LEEK
4TH ALEX LIVINGSTON
5TH DEXTER STRICKLAND

CLASS 1 – 2ND YEAR APPRENTICE
1ST ED DODD
2ND CALLUM TULLEY

CLASS 2 – 3RD YEAR APPRENTICE
1ST SAM DUERN
2ND ED DODD
3RD JOSHUA FROST
4TH SAM CROMPTON
5TH ALEX WHITTINGTON

CLASS 2 – 4TH YEAR APPRENTICE
1ST IAN NIXON
2ND GARETH MC WHINNEY

CLASS 3 EAGLE EYE
1ST RUSSELL JONES -1
2ND SAM CROMPTON
3RD RUSSELL JONES -2
4TH TOM RICHARDS
5TH ED DODD
6TH MARCUS JONES

CLASS 4 INTERMEDIATE
1ST KRIS PARKIN
2ND SAM JOHNSON
3RD MAURICE GUILFOYLE
4TH ADAM BRADLEY
5TH TOM RICHARDS
6TH ALEX LIVINGSTON

CLASS 5 OPEN
1ST CHARLES HUGHES
2ND JAMIE BOURNE-WITHY
3RD KRIS PARKIN
4TH RUSSELL JONES
5TH TOM RICHARDS
6TH ADAM BRADLEY

1  5 6

Posted in Farrier competitions, Shoemaking | Tagged , ,

Steven Beane knives

Steven Beane, multi-world champion farrier has introduced his range of hoof knives under his brand name, Beanie Tools Ltd

Steven Beane

 

There are a number of options – curved and wide blade knives with a brass topper and loop knife options including small and large loops incorporating the Beanie Flick groover – used as a clench groover. That is, for digging a small groove in the dorsal hoof wall so the nail can clench tightly into the hoof.

Steven, from Yorkshire, England has won the World Champion Blacksmiths competition at Calgary, Canada four times (to date) which is quite an achievement. He lists his influences in the trade as Hugh Dwyer, Glenn Brooke, Gary Darlow, Darrin Bazin, Richard Ellis, Derek Gardner, Andrew Nickals, Andrew Casserly and Spud Allison.

The range of knives is available worldwide including free shipping from http://www.farrier-shop.com/brands/Beanie-Tools-Ltd.html

Posted in Farrier Supplies Australia, Farrier supplies NZ, Farrier tools and gear | Tagged , , , ,

Happy Birthday to all the Horses

You know that saying  “There’s something about the outside of a horse that’s good for the inside of a man”… I recently had a tumble off my horse, after getting my spur stuck on an electric fence, yeah dumb, I know!  He zoomed, I felt like a cartoon character and the next thing you know, I was lying flat on my back, waking up from a little snooze.  Hospital with bruised kidney and head injury.

Today a whole week from the little bleep in my fabulous riding career (sarcastic note in voice), I was feeding out and just stopped to listen to said horse “Vin” chomp his hay.   He muzzled it around, lazily with his eyes half closed and I thought… this… right now, must be one of my most favourite sounds.

And now I realise that concussion, mothers brain and hangovers are all very similar. You start a story and go off in a complete and utter tangent.

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Happy Birthday to all the pretty little horses

– Desiree

Posted in Horse care | Tagged , , , , | 3 Comments

Fergus is missing two shoes

We like this Fergus cartoon by Jean Abernethy so wanted to share it with you

Fergus lost shoes

 

“Fergus is missing two shoes this time, Dad”

“Doggone it! Which two?”

Posted in Farrier Services | Tagged , , ,

You can call us 24 hours a day

We understand that life can be hectic and that not everybody has the chance to order things from our farrier supplies store during regular business hours.

For those who prefer to order over the phone, we now accept telephone orders 24 hours a day, seven days a week.

If you need to talk to us or would like to place an order over the phone, our numbers are 0800 211 212 (NZ), 1800 195 088 (Australia) +64 21 555 213 (internationally)

Posted in Farrier supplies NZ, Farrier tools and gear | Tagged ,

Stephen Hill – Farrier

Stephen Hill

Stephen Hill runs a successful farriery practise based in Leicestershire. He is a regular competitor in addition to being a Worshipful Company of Farriers Judge and Examiner.

Stephen Hill farrier

This interview was conducted whilst he was driving home from judging the Best Shod Horse at the Royal Norfolk Show.

Why did you decide to become a farrier?

I used to watch the farrier, William Williams, shoe at home when I was about 14 years old. I am now training his son!

Who (or what) has been your biggest influence or inspiration in your career both within and outside the profession and how?

There are far too many to mention! As an apprentice, Alan Bailey was extremely influential. During my training I watched Ian Allison (‘Spud’) and David Smith (‘Smithy’) compete at the England team trials which was amazing and were the start of my inspiration to compete. And latterly Martin Deacon amongst others.

What’s the most unusual shoeing job that you have done?

Shoeing ‘poitou’ donkeys (giant donkeys) at Hamerton Zoo Park. I currently have a foal there with toe extensions.

What is the funniest incident you have experienced whilst at work?

Funny for others – I was mounted by a laminitic Shetland stallion. He was tied with a short lead as he bit a lot, I was dressing the feet forward and he got hold of the back of my shirt and pinned me against the wall. The owner and a farrier friend with me were hiding in the stable laughing.

If you didn’t become a farrier what do you think you would have done? (If you could do it all again would you be a farrier?!)

Hunt service – a huntsman.

What has been your highest point of your career so far?

Winning Best Shod Horse at Burghley Horse Trials for the third time (with different horses).

What has been the lowest point of your career so far?

Haven’t got one!

What is the biggest regret you have in your career so far?

Not doing my higher exams earlier. I now have a lot going on (four children!) and, as it is harder to make money now as the profit margins have got smaller it is hard finding the time.

What advice would you offer those just beginning their apprenticeship?

Just because somebody tells you to do something one way, question it and ask why.

What advice would you offer those just starting up their own business?

Don’t undersell yourself, do good work for a good price. You are only as good as your last job.

What’s your next goal?

Fellowship and becoming a wealthy land owner!

Why do you participate in farriery competitions?

To better myself and to put my work up to be judged by others. There is no point in not getting any feedback on your work.

What do you think the farriery industry will look like in the next 20 years?

I think the standard of farriery will drop overall. The number of farriers will drop and farriers will be shoeing more horses. As prices are being driven down and input costs remain high, farriers may be driven to shoe more quickly and less conscientiously.

What do you think is the biggest threat to the farriery industry?

Itself. Farriers need to look at their own industry before we look at others, such as “barefooters and the likes of”.

What is your biggest concern for the farriery industry?

That we lose the shoemaking and forging skills we currently have.

What keeps you sane and motivated when you are having a bad day?

My children.

Favourite past time away from hot steel and horses?

Hunting and shooting.

Trick or tip (please provide a trick or a tip, this may be shoeing, shoemaking or trimming or could be getting money out of bad payers or handling nervous horses)

Don’t shoe the 3 ‘sh’s’ – shits, shetlands and shires.

____

Interview by Claire Brown

Posted in Farrier business, Shoemaking | Tagged , , , ,

Jim Blurton farrier tool box

We just received some Jim Blurton aluminium farrier tool boxes in stock

Designed for the forward-thinking farrier, these tool boxes have a compartment for all of the common farrier tools – helping to keep them protected and reduce the damage from other tools.

At the top, there is an area for nail boxes – handy for access when nailing on horseshoes.

A leather knife pocket on the side is suitable for any knife including a safe place for a searcher or speciality knife.

On each side of the box is a spot for two hoof rasps (one on each side). It’s quick and easy to throw the rasp into the box whilst you’re still working underneath the horse.

The three shelves are (like all the other compartments) lined with a rubber inlay to protect the tools and also reduce the clatter of tools on the metal box. These three trays have plenty of space for nippers, pull offs, nail pullers, clenchers and any other farrier tools that are used on a daily basis.

Jim Blurton ali tool box

The wheels on the bottom of the box help with portability when shoeing and trimming. It’s easier to drag the box on the wheels rather than lifting.

The build quality of this tool box results in a very practical and aesthetically pleasing piece of kit which any modern farrier should find useful.

NZ$425 (exc GST and shipping)

The Jim Blurton ali farrier tool box is available from NZ Farriers Ltd 0800 211 212 (NZ) david@farrier.co.nz or online at farrier-shop.com 

Posted in Farrier supplies NZ, Farrier tools and gear | Tagged , , , | 1 Comment

Steven Beane – Farriery Focus

Steven Beane AWCF

Steven Beane is the current World Champion Blacksmith and has held this position for FOUR years! A formidable presence on the competition circuit Steven has been a member of the England International Farriery Team for the last 11 years. Steven lives and works in North Yorkshire, England and, in addition to his shoeing round conducts clinics for small groups of people at his forge and has just launched his own range of tools.

Steven Beane farrier

Why did you decide to become a farrier?

I’ve ridden since I was 5, and have wanted to shoe since I was 13 after watching our local farrier.

Who (or what) has been your biggest influence or inspiration in your career both within and outside the profession and how?

My family has always being very supportive. I have had many important influences…  to name just a few – my old master Hugh Dyer, Glenn Brooke, Gary Darlow, Darren Bazin, Richard Ellis, Derek Gardner, Andrew Nickals, Andrew Casserly, Ian (Spud) Allison

What’s the most unusual shoeing job that you have done?

In my everyday work I stick to basic fundamentals, horse shoeing is not rocket science.

What is the funniest incident you have experienced whilst at work?

Many over the years but none stand out.

If you didn’t become a farrier what do you think you would have done? (If you could do it all again would you be a farrier?!)

I have always wanted to be a farrier.

What has been your highest point of your career so far?

Probably winning the World Championships

What has been the lowest point of your career so far?

I try to avoid low points..

What is the biggest regret you have in your career so far?

None really.

What advice would you offer those just beginning their apprenticeship?

Work hard, listen hard, and try hard.

What advice would you offer those just starting up their own business?

Offer a first class service; be prompt and reliable, answer the phone and return calls and messages. Let the client know if you are running late.

What’s your next goal?

Keep doing the big shows and probably one day my FWCF.

Why do you participate in farriery competitions?

I love the buzz, and socialising with my friends.

What do you think the farriery industry will look like in the next 20 years? Do you think we will have more or less farriers, do you think training will have changed?

It will probably be over populated in Britain. The current training system is okay in my opinion… 4 years is the right length of time.

What do you think is the biggest threat to the farriery industry?

Over population and price undercutting to get work.

What is your biggest concern for the farriery industry?

As above.

What keeps you sane and motivated when you are having a bad day?

Coffee!

Favourite past time away from hot steel and horses?

Sad as it sounds, horse shoeing is my life and competitions are my hobby. But I like spending time with family and friends to unwind.

Trick or tip (please provide a trick or a tip, this may be shoeing, shoemaking or trimming or could be getting money out of bad payers or handling nervous horses)

I’d have to say the flick groover I’ve just released to the market! I’ve been using it for a few years now in secret and it’s a fast and efficient tool!

Interview by Claire Brown

Posted in Farrier business, Farrier tools and gear, Shoemaking | Tagged , , , ,